Vintage Contemporary 1980s Ceramic Studio Pottery Decorative Jar
Vintage Contemporary 1980s Ceramic Studio Pottery Decorative Jar
Vintage Contemporary 1980s Ceramic Studio Pottery Decorative Jar
Vintage Contemporary 1980s Ceramic Studio Pottery Decorative Jar
Vintage Contemporary 1980s Ceramic Studio Pottery Decorative Jar
Vintage Contemporary 1980s Ceramic Studio Pottery Decorative Jar

Vintage Contemporary 1980s Ceramic Studio Pottery Decorative Jar

Vendor
Absolutely Nice Vintage
Regular price
£55.00
Sale price
£55.00
Quantity must be 1 or more

Studio pottery is pottery made by professional and amateur artists or artisans working alone or in small groups, making unique items or short runs. Typically, all stages of manufacture are carried out by the artists themselves. 

 

If you're looking for unique, decorative yet functional items for your home, studio pottery is the way to go. Becoming more and more fashionable, these stand out pieces usually in muted, earthy tones would look lovely in any style home. 

 

Brighter than most studio pottery we come across, very typical of its 1980s era and with a striking shape, size and fun squiggle design, this decorative container is sure to stand out on any shelf. We're unsure of it's actual function, as the opening is not large enough to get your hand into and probably not very easy to pour out of, either way it's a great looking piece, very reminiscent of the ceramic works by Dorothy Hafner. 

 

In good condition with some little nibbles to the bottom as photographed. 

 

Measures approximately 15cm wide, 15cm deep and 22cm tall, 25cm tall to the lid. 

 

 

Jane Sinclair Foster

 

Jane’s interest for pottery was sparked at St Aidan’s School in Carlisle (1972 - 1980). She would later go on to study foundation art at Carlisle Art College (1980-1981) majoring in ceramics and later gaining a prestigious place at Camberwell School of Art, studying under and much influenced Janice Tchalenko.

 

Jane’s first order for her ceramics was from The Designer’s Guild in London.  She also received orders from Liberty, Harrods, Strangeways in Covent Garden, Saks on 5th Avenue New York and many lucrative galleries and collectors alike in her short career.

 

Being a young start up business, based in Brixton from early 1985, the Prince’s Trust funded the purchase of a kiln for Jane. Prince Charles even invited her to a showcase of businesses he’d helped. It was here that Jane met Prince Charles and he fell in love with her work. 

 

One day, Jane received a call from the Palace asking her to take in some work to show Prince Charles where he would place an order for two lamp bases. Embarrassed at driving an Austin Allegro, Jane hired a car and delivered the work to Buckingham Palace herself. 

 

Jane gained much joy and quite a following with her ceramics, however being short of money and alone in London meant Jane unfortunately had to give it all up and got a job as an estate agent. Jane now lives in Wimbledon with her family where she is a personal trainer working outside in her local South Park Gardens.

 

With regards to the process of Jane’s ceramics, her pots are ’T’ material and slip-decorated by hand with brushes, stencils, layering colours and patterns. They are then fired to bisque then spray glazed and fired to earthenware temperatures. This firing process engineers the ‘crazed’ finish, her unique selling proposition.

 

For those of you that live in the UK and have a similar love for studio pottery, make sure you pay a visit to the York Art Gallery. Now the world’s most extensive collection of British Studio Pottery, with more than 5,000 pieces, well worth a trip.